Slave narratives lead to research

Slave narratives lead to research

Slavery's effects on the slaves themselves are being studied through narratives by a Sul Ross State University student.

By using interviews and literature along with other narratives, Whitehead intends to determine how slaves were affected by their bondage.

"I am exploring the male and female narratives, examining their experiences and comparing them or seeing how they are different, how slavery affected them," she said.

Using Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs as her main sources, Whitehead describes how the roles for men and women slaves were different.

Sailors Throwing Slaves Overboard, from Torrey's "American Slave Trade," 1822




Sailors Throwing Slaves Overboard, from Torrey's "American Slave Trade," 1822


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Whitehead explained that some female slaves were separated from their families. They were forced to be mothers to children by slave owners, and in some cases had their husbands chosen for them.

Other effects on female slaves were sexual abuse by owners and how the slaves' children were affected.

"Slave men were affected more on a personal level, they desired literacy. Frederick Douglass knew education was power." she said.



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