Civil War Revealed

Civil War Revealed

A new exhibit comprised of old bullets, tarnished guns, weathered musical instruments and creased, wrinkled and tattered letters attracted dozens of curious visitors to the Cayuga Museum of History and Art in Auburn Friday to learn how the Civil War impacted the local community.

Enoch Hooper Cook, Jr., Pvt, Co. H. 38th Alabama Infantry, C.S.A.




Enoch Hooper Cook, Jr., Pvt, Co. H. 38th Alabama Infantry, C.S.A.


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Visitors read the personal letters and viewed photographs of local soldiers in order to get a glimpse into the lives they left behind when they left Auburn and the surrounding towns and villages to fight for the North.

The Hunley submarine is raised after sinking during the Civil War




The Hunley submarine is raised after sinking during the Civil War


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The personal letters depicted the soldiers’ experiences, their desire for the war to end and ultimately their desire to return home.

Museum curator Lauren Chyle said many people are fascinated by the Civil War because of the impact it had on almost every citizen in every community.

Sgt. Joseph Dore, 7th N.Y.S.M., c.1865




Sgt. Joseph Dore, 7th N.Y.S.M., c.1865


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“The Civil War is unique in the fact that it did affect so many people and so many families,” Chyle said. “So many people died. Back in the communities, women took a bigger role running home and running aid groups because so many men were fighting.”

Fort Frederick, Patowmack Canal, Maryland, USA




Fort Frederick, Patowmack Canal, Maryland, USA


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While the Civil War is the deadliest conflict in terms of the number of Americans killed in action, more soldiers died from diseases due to poor living conditions instead of enemy fire, Chyle said.

A photograph of Civil War soldier John Gowing illustrated that point, as a tiny note placed next to the picture states that he died of yellow fever.

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